University Catalog


Published by
Greenleaf University
NRA, 7777 North Wickham Road, Suite 12-309
Melbourne, Florida 32940, USA

Board of Trustees
Norman Pearson, Ph.D., D.B.A., President
Dr. Francis P. DeCaro, Chairman, Registrar, and Chief Financial Officer

Faculty and Staff

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction
Facts about Greenleaf University
Mission
Purposes
Background
Core Values
Admissions
Doctoral Program
Degree
Academic Program
Building Research Capacity
Curriculum Enhancements
Tuition and Fees
Application
Tuition
Course Materials
Orientation
Residency
Capstone Integration, Proposal, and Dissertation Orals
Dissertation Processing
Graduation Fee
Refund Policy
Withdrawal, Dismissal, and Readmission
Financial Aid
Student Services
Administrative Support
Library Services
Internet Access
Application for Admissions
Contractual Agreement of English Fluency


INTRODUCTION TO GREENLEAF UNIVERSITY

Facts About Greenleaf University

Ph.D. Program in Leadership and Administration
Master Programs in Servant Leadership and Futures Studies
Core values of Servant Leadership and 21st Century Studies
A Distance Learning University
Developed for the mid-career professional
Directly related to learner's work environment
Program can be completed in as little as two years
Qualified faculty-mentors
B.B.A. and B.Sc.

Mission Statement

Greenleaf University is a distance-learning institution of higher education with a special public service cause of furthering the academic education of mid-career professionals in leadership and administration with an emphasis on servant leadership and alternative futures.

The University believes that an earned degree includes a profound understanding of classical and contemporary leadership and administrative theories and the application of these theories to a work environment. Leaders must be forward looking, and know how to manage change, and integrate theory, technology and practice.

GU provides formal education in leadership and administration theories and requires learners to practice these tenets in their work environment. Greenleaf University believes that all qualified mid-career professionals, regardless of their geographic location, have an equal right to participate in institutions of higher education. Greenleaf University offers this opportunity within an environment which stimulates personal, professional, and leadership growth.

Purposes

The purposes of Greenleaf University are as follows:

to provide academic preparation of the highest quality for professionals in leadership and administration with emphasis on servant leadership and alternative futures.

to encourage freedom of inquiry and a free exchange of ideas among learners, faculty, administrators and staff of
Greenleaf University.

to combine theory and practice which prepares professionals for leadership responsibilities.

to provide the support necessary for learners to successfully complete the program of study and to overcome any
completion deficiencies.

to strive for excellence in teaching and learning through the learning pathway of Greenleaf University.

Background

Robert K. Greenleaf is the namesake of Greenleaf University. He is considered by many academicians in the field of organization and administration to be the father of the modern empowerment movement. Greenleaf (1904-1990) was a managing director of AT&T and visiting professor at MIT and Harvard Business School. Following his retirement from AT&T, he founded the Center for Applied Ethics in 1964. This was later re-named The Greenleaf Center. As the founder of the Center, he wrote and lectured extensively, influencing generations of leaders and leadership experts.

Robert Greenleaf was one of the first twentieth century proponents of Servant Leadership. His life was spent teaching that true leaders lead by serving others. They set the example and live by the example they set. They understand that the leadership role is not an entitlement but the object of earned trust. They understand that one must respect the follower in order to lead.

True leaders also understand the necessity of allowing their followers to attain their full potential by empowering them. True leaders serve their organization and the followers of the organization through action and example.

Greenleaf University was founded in 1989 as the Institute for Professional Studies. One of the core values of IPS has always been Servant Leadership. In 1996, in order to more closely align the name of the school with its core values, Greenleaf University was addended to IPS, and the "professional studies" were more narrowly defined as relating to leadership and administration. The entire title is "Greenleaf University, Institute for Professional Studies, an American Graduate School." For the sake of convenience, this generally is shortened to "Greenleaf University." Greenleaf University offers a generic doctoral degree, a Ph.D. in Leadership and Administration and four Master degree programs.

Core Values

The first core value of Greenleaf University is Servant Leadership. Educating the leaders of today and tomorrow in servant leadership is the foundational precept of the institution. The purpose of Greenleaf University is to advance servant leadership in the professional environment for the betterment of society.

In addition to Servant Leadership, Greenleaf University was founded on three other core values. The first is that true learning comes from a combination of study and practice. A purely traditional graduate program may teach theory only. Upon graduation, the traditional student has learned theory in depth. Greenleaf University believes that true learning is more than a familiarity with theory. It also requires an ability to apply the theory to practice. The Greenleaf program was developed for the mid-career professional. Greenleaf University cannot teach experience. However, it can create an environment in which the learner studies leadership theory in-depth and uses critical thinking to link this newly developed theoretical base to professional experience.

The work environment is seen as the laboratory in which to amalgamate the theory which the learner has studied with the reality of the learner's professional practices. The Greenleaf program serves as the crucible to combine theory and practice. The result is a well-rounded, educated professional who has combined classical and contemporary leadership theory with the depth that only experience can bring.

Another core value of Greenleaf University is that an advanced degree must be earned. However, it should not be impossible to the qualified, dedicated learner. Graduates of Greenleaf University have tremendous and well-deserved pride in attaining their degrees.

Individuals who complete the program not only know they have earned the degree, but have a new-found respect for those who also have attained advanced degrees, and identify their place in society as scholar-practitioners. Learners demonstrate that they competently apply the theory to the work environment. The path is rigorous, demanding, and many times tedious--but ultimately rewarding.

Greenleaf University also believes that the major function of the academic institution is to illuminate the path of learning. Espousing and practicing servant leadership means that Greenleaf University understands that the sole purpose of the staff and faculty is to serve the learner in pursuit of the goal of an advanced degree. Greenleaf University is a true community of learners--staff, faculty, student body, and alumni.

Traditional graduate programs have completion rates as low as 20%. A fifty percent completion rate is considered to be excellent. The Greenleaf University doctoral program historical completion rate is over 60%. This is due to the standards of admission, good mentoring, maturity and commitment of the adult learner, and support of the administration.

Greenleaf University learners are, by definition, achievers. The requirements for a GU degree are no less demanding than those of other traditional and non-traditional graduate schools. However, to qualify for entry, the prospective learner first must demonstrate a history of high professional achievement. Once matriculated, the learner will find that Greenleaf University provides a complete support system from library services, to internet support, to responsive and caring faculty and staff. Mentoring and assistance continues from entry through graduation.

The last core value is the forward thrust of Greenleaf University. Although grounded in classical theory, the degree requires that the learner enter the twenty-first century and become extensively involved in future studies. If not already on-line, the learner quickly will be introduced to the global community through the internet and World Wide Web. All learners work through the University's computer system. The foundation of both the university and the academic programs is classical. However, the vision and results of the programs are futuristic.

Admissions

Requirements. To qualify for admission, a prospective learner must meet the following two criteria:

Possess a degree from a regionally accredited or internationally recognized institution
Have at least five years of experience in the professional work force

Procedure. The process of applying for admission to Greenleaf University is as follows:

Complete an application form, and forward with a non-refundable fee of $50.00.

Request the institution from which you received your degree(s) to send an official copy of transcripts directly to GU.

Contact two references and request them to send a letter of recommendation concerning your ability to complete a graduate degree. These letters should be sent directly to Greenleaf University. References should be either educators or professionals in your work environment.

Complete and forward a resume of not more than two pages reflecting your professional and academic background and accomplishments.

Complete and forward an agreement reflecting your understanding that English is the required language of the Greenleaf University program, that all submissions will be written in English, and that your proficiency is such that you will have no difficulty with course material or texts in English.


Degrees

Greenleaf University offers the following Master of Science degrees:

Master of Science in Futures Studies (MSFS)

Master of Science in Leadership and Administration (MSLA)


Greenleaf University offers the following doctoral degree:

Ph.D., Doctor of Philosophy in Leadership and Administration

The Greenleaf University
Master of Science Programs

The Greenleaf University Master of Science programs are based on our core values of servant leadership and futures studies. Both are rigorous courses of 30 credit hours each, requiring completion of three core modules, three elective modules, and a major paper or project.

The Greenleaf University
Doctoral Program

A doctoral degree differs from a Master degree in several key areas. A basic difference is that a Master degree demonstrates mastery in a specific field. A doctoral degree reflects more than knowledge. It requires that the candidate further the body of knowledge. This is done through expanding, evolving, proving, or disproving a theory. In the alternative, the candidate can propose an alternative theory. However, in any case the dissertation must be grounded in classical theory.

Academic Programs

Doctor of Philosophy in Leadership and Administration; Doctor of Philosophy in Futures Studies

The program requires a minimum of two years and a maximum of five years for completion. The program is based on Servant Leadership and 21st Century studies.

The program totals 96 credit hours. The distribution of credits involves 66 credits of module or course work and 30 credits awarded to the dissertation. The curriculum consists of ten modules or courses. Each module in turn contains three components of three credits each for a total of nine credits per module.

There are four core modules and three elective modules required for a total of 63 credits. In addition, a Personal and Professional Growth Plan valued at three credits is required of each student. Although the Plan is the initial task for each student, it is revisited and updated annually.

All students are required to take the four core modules, although the order in which they are taken is not prescribed. Similarly, students may choose elective modules before they have completed the core requirements.

Transfer Policy

Students may transfer in no more than 27 credits. No more than one core course may be transferred. There are no transfer options for the Personal and Professional Growth Plan or for the Dissertation.

The Personal and Professional Growth Plan-PPGP(3 Credit Hours)

Upon acceptance into the program and receipt of payment for materials, Greenleaf University mails to the learner program materials which include a booklet entitled The Personal and Professional Growth Plan. The PPGP assists the learner in reviewing his/her professional experiences in depth. By identifying strengths and interests, the learner prepares a foundation from which to develop a dissertation topic. The PPGP also assists the learner in preparing a study plan and a potential time line for progression through the program. Upon initial completion of the PPGP, the learner will have a much better idea of his/her starting point, the requirements of a Ph.D., and an organizational plan which can lead to completion and graduation.

Upon completion of the PPGP, the learner will forward it to the faculty mentor. Approval of a submitted work is a two-step process. The faculty mentor either will recommend the PPGP for approval or will return it to the learner for revisions. If the faculty mentor recommends approval, it will be forwarded to the Vice President for Academic Affairs for final approval. The Vice President for Academic Affairs, working in conjunction with the faculty mentor, either will grant final approval or will return it to the learner for revision.

The Personal and Professional Growth Plan requires that the learner annually review and update the PPGP. In this way, the PPGP becomes both a diagnostic tool and a directional tool for evolution. The PPGP is valued at three credit hours.

The Curriculum (10 Modules, nine credit hours each)

The curriculum is divided into two parts--the Core Modules and the Elective Modules. The Core Modules are more foundational and generic in nature. In addition, although applications to students' fields and professions occur throughout the program, the Elective Modules particularly emphasize career options. Students may make special arrangements to take more than the required three Elective Modules.

Core Modules (36 Credit Hours)

1. Management of Transformation and Innovation (9 Credit Hours)

An analysis of the management of change, the use of strategic planning as a way of disciplining and monitoring change, and the development of communication strategies to insure that the innovations are known, valued and shared. Case studies will be cited to demonstrate how different structures and organizations manage change.


2. Futures Research: Forecasting Methodologies and Models (9 Credit Hours)

An exploration of the principal forecasting and trending instruments used to establish the parameters and simulations of future events and behaviors, the use of risk analysis and risk assessment to estimate impacts, and the capacity of Delphi and scenarios to simulate future events.


3. Future Leaders, Managers, and Workers (9 Credit Hours)

A presentation of the future roles and relationships between leaders, managers, and workers in both the public and private sectors, nationally and globally. Particular attention will be paid to the notion of the Servant Leaders of a Servant Institution.


4. Futures Research Agenda (9 Credit Hours)

A compilation of major futures research agenda items by field and profession. It will be created by each student for his/her profession and organization and combine those items drawn from the bibliography as well as the student's own profession. Indeed, it is highly likely that the student's own dissertation research will involve one or more of these major research agenda items.

Elective Modules (3 of 6 Modules, 9 Credit Hours each = 27 Credit Hours)

5. Communication and Information Systems (9 Credit Hours)

An analysis of the art and science of knowledge management, the current and future state of information systems, the use of distance learning and training via internet and satellite, and the long range projections of the future of the World Wide Web.

6. Organizational Structures and Behaviors (9 Credit Hours)

An examination of the major international agencies, their structural configurations, and their roles in promoting international stability and national integrity. Particular emphasis will be placed on multinational organizations especially those that have entered into overseas partnerships and joint ventures.

7. Globality (9 Credit Hours)

A description and analysis of demographics, economics, and diversity of the global economy and competition; the commitment of multinationals to world quality standards such as ISO 9000; and the prospects in the future for internal trade and joint ventures. Particular attention will be paid to the characteristics and qualities of the global leader and manager in all fields and sectors, especially managing across cultures.

8. The Environment and Sustainable Development (9 Credit Hours)

An examination of the global environment and of environmental organizations and groups; the linkage between environmental protection and sustainable economic development; the limits to growth, global simulation, and the prospect for environmental stability in the 21st century.

9. Technology (9 Credit Hours)

An exploration of the major technological breakthroughs that are likely to occur in the next 25 years; an estimate of the various orders of impacts such technologies will have on world commerce and productivity; the use of technology assessment as a form of technology risk analysis; and the use of innovation training as a spur to technology inventiveness.

10. Systems Theory (9 Credit Hours)

A discussion of the nature of classic, current, and future theories of systems and their capacity to explain and to some extent predict the behaviors of large scale organizations, followed by a series of typical systems theory applications via case studies.


Curriculum Guides

A curriculum guide has been developed for each module. The format for each module is as follows:

1. Objectives (Stated as outcomes of mastery)


2. Rationale
a. Why study this material?
b. If a Core module, why Core?
c. Justification in a futures curriculum.
d. Linkages to other modules and the total curriculum.
e. Elements and factors of integration and synthesis.
f. Global and international dimensions and applications.

3. Theoretical Base

a. History of Theories
b. Current schools of thought
c. Indications of future paradigms

4. Parameters
a. Scope of module
b. Limits
c. Overlaps
d. Interdisciplinarity

5. The Syllabus
a. Breadth--The Macro View
b. Depth--Macro-Micro Intersect
c. Application--Micro

6. Bibliography
a. Concept of Literature Review
b. Nature of annotated bibliography
c. Critical evaluation of bibliography
d. Seminal authors only for the module. (All subsequent and additional sources are searched electronically)

7. Evaluation

a. Student self-assessment of mastery of outcomes
b. Faculty evaluation of student work and capacity for evaluation and integration of knowledge and research

Capstone Integration Orals

At the completion of all seven modules and prior to undertaking work on the research proposal of the dissertation, each student will participate in an orals discussion with a number of faculty. The focus of the discussion is to assess the integrated knowledge of the seven modules completed by each student. The knowledge of each module already has been separately evaluated. Here the emphasis is on the integration and synthesis of the knowledge of the total program as selected by the student. The linkage process has been prepared for by building into the format of each module its relationship to other modules and the total program.

Dissertation

After successful completion of the Capstone Integration Orals, each learner will undertake a doctoral project, or a dissertation. The dissertation is expected to meet the highest standards of scholarship and inquiry. The project must have practical, as well as theoretical, application and must be generalizable to fields beyond the local professional practice of the learner. A global application is highly desirable.

All forms of doctoral inquiry are acceptable as doctoral projects. However, all projects must result in significant new knowledge for the professional fields beyond the local or specific situation.

Building Research Capacity

Since adult learners especially at the doctoral levels tend to be rich in experience and application, but poor in theory and research, and because the Ph.D. is a research oriented degree, special attention and commitment must be paid to building research capacity from the start of the program to its culmination in the research dissertation.

The following aspects of the total program are designed to structure a progressively developing research capability:

1. Personal and Professional Growth Plan (3 Credits)

Requires each student to begin the process of identifying potential dissertation research topics and the resources that would be necessary to accomplish that research. Because the Plan must be updated annually, the developmental dimension will particularly be apparent in the more mature discussion of the potential dissertation topics and resources.

2. Research Core Modules

Two of the four required Core modules are devoted to research designs and methodologies. In addition, the curriculum format for all modules has built into it research exercises and especially research evaluation. Indeed, the application section of each module is a mini-research project often applicable to the dissertation.

3. Residencies

All residencies feature workshops on research design, qualitative and quantitative research, statistical analysis, the design of survey and questionnaire instruments, etc.

4. Dissertation Research Proposal

Before the dissertation can be undertaken, a research proposal must be developed and approved by the student's Dissertation Committee. The research proposal minimally consists of three sections or chapters. These address the statement of the research questions and hypotheses; a literature review; discussion of the research design and methodology; and the prognosis or plan for data presentation, conclusions, and recommendations.

Although the Greenleaf University doctoral program is very demanding, it is also extremely supportive. The learner will find the process from initiate to doctor to be challenging, exhilarating, and worth-while. Unlike other graduate programs the program is explicit, and the staff and faculty support the learner from beginning to completion.

Master of Science in Leadership and Administration

The Master of Science in Leadership and Administration (MSLA) program totals 30 credit hours. The distribution of credits involves 24 credits of module or course work and 5 credits awarded to the major paper/project. The curriculum consists of six modules or courses. Each module in turn contains three components (courses): breadth (two credits), depth (one credit) and application (one credit) for a total of four credits per module.

There are three core modules and three elective modules required for a total of 24 credits. In addition, a Personal and Professional Growth Plan valued at one credit is required of each student. Although the PPGP is the initial task for each student, it is revisited and updated periodically.

All students are required to take the three core modules, although the order in which they are taken is not prescribed. Similarly, students may choose elective modules before they have completed the core requirements.

Transfer Policy

Students may transfer in no more than 15 credits. No more than two core courses may be transferred. There are no transfer options for the Personal and Professional Growth Plan or for the major paper/project.

The Personal and Professional Growth Plan (PPGP) (1 Credit Hour) (500)

The Personal and Professional Growth Plan (PPGP) is addressed in detail in a separate publication. The PPGP is an initial assessment assisting the learner in the development of an individualized study program. It provides the learner with a unique perspective of past experience, present goals, and future professional growth potential, as well as a first draft of a realistic study program and time line leading to degree completion.

The Curriculum Overview (6 Modules, four credit hours each)

The curriculum is divided into two parts--the Core Modules and the Elective Modules. The Core Modules are more foundational and generic in nature. In addition, although applications to students' fields and professions occur throughout the program, the Elective Modules particularly emphasize career options. Students may make special arrangements to take more than the required three Elective Modules.

Core Modules (3 Modules, 4 Credit Hours each=12 Credit Hours)

LA - 501: Leadership and Management (4 Credit Hours)

A presentation of the future roles and relationships between leaders, managers, and workers in both the public and private sectors, nationally and globally; examination of the relationships between authentic leadership and creative management including the challenge of followership and what leadership is about; tools of the leader; servant leadership.

LA - 502: Organizational Structure and Behavior (4 Credit Hours)

An examination of the major international agencies, their structural configurations, and their roles in promoting international stability and national integrity; discussion of the likely evolution of organizations in the future and the impact of multinational organizations, international organizations and trends in organizational development and behavior.

LA - 503: Research Methodologies (4 Credit Hours)

An examination of numerous research methodologies and their uses. An exploration of the principal forecasting and trending instruments used to establish the parameters and simulations of future events and behaviors, the use of risk analysis and risk assessment to estimate impacts, and the capacity of Delphi and scenarios to simulate and evaluate events.

Elective Modules (3 of 6 Modules, 4 Credit Hours each=12 Credit Hours)

LA - 511: The Challenges of Globality (4 Credit Hours)

An examination of the historical development of current globalization; a description and analysis of demographics, economics, and diversity of the global economy and competition; the commitment of multinationals to world quality standards such as ISO 9000; and the prospects in the future for international trade, global integration, and joint venture.

LA - 512: The Challenges of Technology (4 Credit Hours)

An examination of the role of technology as a driving force of social change, and the major technological breakthroughs that are likely to occur in the next 25 years; the phenomenon of social change; an estimate of the various orders of impacts such technologies will have on world commerce and productivity; the use of technology assessment as a form of technology risk analysis.

LA - 513: Managing Change (4 Credit Hours)

An analysis of the management of change; the use of strategic planning as a way of disciplining and monitoring change; the development of communication strategies to insure that the innovations are known, valued and shared; an appreciation of the role of the change agent. Case studies will be cited to demonstrate how different structures and organizations manage change.

LA - 514: Systems Thinking: Theory & Practice (4 Credit Hours)

An examination of the basic theories of systems thinking and the uses of systems theory in practice, particularly in
multi-disciplinary studies and complex situations and problems.

LA - 515: Communications & Information Systems (4 Credit Hours)

An examination of the revolution in contemporary communications; an analysis of the art and science of knowledge management, the current and future state of information systems, the use of distance learning and training via internet and satellite; and the long range projections of the future of the World Wide Web.

LA - 516: Sustainable Development: Illusion or Reality (4 Credit Hours)

An examination of the global environment and of environmental organizations and groups; the linkage between environmental, protection, and sustainable economic development; the limits to growth; global simulation; the prospect for environmental stability in the 21st century.

Major Paper/Project

LA - 550: Major Paper/Project Research (5 Credit Hours)


The selection of a topic; working to complete the research and to write up an acceptable purpose methodology, results and conclusions; producing a satisfactory paper or project report.

Master of Science in Future Studies

The Master of Science in Futures Studies (MSFS) program totals 30 credit hours. The distribution of credits involves 24credits of module or course work and 5 credits awarded to the major paper/project. The curriculum consists of six modules or courses. Each module in turn contains three components (courses): breadth (two credits), depth (one credit) and application (one credit) for a total of four credits per module.

There are three core modules and three elective modules required for a total of 24 credits. In addition, a Personal and Professional Growth Plan valued at one credit is required of each student. Although the PPGP is the initial task for each student, it is revisited and updated periodically.

All students are required to take the three core modules, although the order in which they are taken is not prescribed. Similarly, students may choose elective modules before they have completed the core requirements.

Transfer Policy

Students may transfer in no more than 15 credits. No more than two core courses may be transferred. There are no transfer options for the Personal and Professional Growth Plan or for the major paper/project.


The Personal and Professional Growth Plan (PPGP) (1 Credit Hour) (500)

The Personal and Professional Growth Plan (PPGP) is addressed in detail in a separate publication. The PPGP is an initial assessment assisting the learner in the development of an individualized study program. It provides the learner with a unique perspective of past experience, present goals, and future professional growth potential, as well as a first draft of a realistic study program and time line leading to degree completion.

The Curriculum Overview (6 Modules, four credit hours each)

The curriculum is divided into two parts--the Core Modules and the Elective Modules. The Core Modules are more foundational and generic in nature. In addition, although applications to students' fields and professions occur throughout the program, the Elective Modules particularly emphasize career options. Students may make special arrangements to take more than the required three Elective Modules.

Core Modules (3 Modules, 4 Credit Hours each=12 Credit Hours)

FS - 501: Leadership and Management (4 Credit Hours)

A presentation of the future roles and relationships between leaders, managers, and workers in both the public and private sectors, nationally and globally; examination of the relationships between authentic leadership and creative management including the challenge of followership and what leadership is about; tools of the leader; servant leadership.

FS - 502: The Literature of Futurology (4 Credit Hours)

A discussion of the "history of the future" and the rich heritage of literature dealing with the future, prior to the creation of modern futurology; the origins of futurology, its evolution, and current issues.


FS - 503: Futures Research Methodologies (4 Credit Hours)

An examination of the numerous futures research methodologies, and their uses. An exploration of the principal forecasting and trending instruments used to establish the parameters and simulations of future events and behaviors, the use of risk analysis and risk assessment to estimate impacts, and the capacity of Delphi and scenarios to simulate and evaluate future events.

Elective Modules (3 of 7 Modules, 4 Credit Hours each=12 Credit Hours)

FS - 511: The Challenges of Globality (4 Credit Hours)

An examination of the historical development of current globalization; a description and analysis of demographics, economics, and diversity of the global economy and competition; the commitment of multinationals to world quality standards such as ISO 9000; and the prospects in the future for international trade, global integration, and joint venture.

FS - 512: The Challenges of Technology (4 Credit Hours)

An examination of the role of technology as a driving force of social change, and the major technological breakthroughs that are likely to occur in the next 25 years; the phenomenon of social change; an estimate of the various orders of impacts such technologies will have on world commerce and productivity; the use of technology assessment as a form of technology risk analysis.

FS - 513: The Future of Organizations (4 Credit Hours)

An examination of the major international agencies, their structural configurations, and their roles in promoting international stability and national integrity; discussion of the likely evolution of organizations in the future and the impact of multinational organizations, international organizations and trends in organizational development and behavior.

FS - 514: The Future of Social Systems (4 Credit Hours)

A discussion of the nature of classic, current, and future theories of systems and their capacity to explain and to some extent predict the behaviors of large scale organizations; the possible scenarios for social evolution beyond the decline of the welfare state and the changes in the nation-state; the emergence of the "third sector;" the decline of government power; the increasing obsolescence of politics and future of capitalism.

FS - 515: Systems Thinking: Theory & Practice (4 Credit Hours)

An examination of the basic theories of systems thinking and the uses of systems theory in practice, particularly in
multi-disciplinary studies and complex situations and problems.

FS - 516: Communications & Information Systems (4 Credit Hours)

An examination of the revolution in contemporary communications; an analysis of the art and science of knowledge management, the current and future state of information systems, the use of distance learning and training via internet and satellite; and the long range projections of the future of the World Wide Web.

FS - 517: Sustainable Development: Illusion or Reality (4 Credit Hours)

An examination of the global environment and of environmental organizations and groups; the linkage between environmental, protection, and sustainable economic development; the limits to growth; global simulation; the prospect for environmental stability in the 21st century.

Major Paper/Project

FS - 550: Major Paper/Project Research (5 Credit Hours)

The selection of a topic; working to complete the research and to write up an acceptable purpose methodology, results and conclusions; producing a satisfactory paper or project report.

Building Research Capacity

(All Master Programs)

Similar to the Greenleaf University doctoral program, the Master of Science programs are research oriented. The following aspects of the total program are designed to structure a progressively developing research capability:

1. Personal and Professional Growth Plan (1 Credit)

The PPGP requires each student to begin the process of identifying potential topics for the major paper/project and the resources that would be necessary to accomplish that research.

2. Research Core Modules

One of the three required core modules is devoted to research designs and methodologies. In addition, the curriculum format for all modules has built into it research exercises and especially research evaluation. The Application Section of each module is a mini-research project often applicable to the major paper/project.

3. Major Paper/Project Proposal

Before the major paper/project can be undertaken, a research proposal must be developed and approved by the student's mentor. The research proposal minimally will consist of three sections or chapters: statement of the research

questions and hypotheses; a literature review; and discussion of the research design and methodology.

There is a basic difference conceptually between the proposal and the major paper/project. Essentially, the proposal is a detailed map or construction plan for the intended research. Time spent in refining it makes the subsequent work much easier.

The major paper/project is a report of work completed. The standard format for the major paper/project essentially evolved from the German research universities more than a century ago, and it has in recent decades been refined into a standard reporting format which is understood around the world.

If this distinction is kept in mind, simple writing errors can be avoided. The proposal is in the future tense, because it describes work to be undertaken, with regard to research elements. In the major paper/project, such elements are in the past tense, because it is a report of work which has been completed.

Curriculum Enhancements
(All Academic Programs)

1. Professional Associations

All students are required to join and be a member of a professional organization or society appropriate to their profession. In addition, all students are required to become members of the World Future Society and are encouraged to be active in regional chapters of WFS.

2. Consultant Training and Application

Each module via its project or application component offers the option of a consulting opportunity. Students electing this option can essentially use the subject matter of the module to construct a consulting or training proposal and have it reviewed by the faculty as a consulting proposal. In addition, occasionally Greenleaf University itself is asked to undertake contract consulting work. Our acceptance is contingent on the extent to which it can provide opportunities for students to serve as consulting associates to the faculty.

3. Career Development

The curriculum has been designed and tested to accommodate a number of different professions and fields. These include, but are not limited to, business administration and management, education, health, human services, nonprofits, public administration, consultants, and entrepreneurs. To facilitate a focus on careers, the first assignment all students must complete and regularly update is a Personal and Professional Growth Plan. This PPGP is the student's career path blueprint throughout the program. Indeed, the updating process requires that at the completion of each module the student makes an entry that reflects the potential impact that module can have on career plans.

4. Publishing and Presentation

The project or application section of each module as well as the dissertation itself provides a number of significant opportunities for the student to convert his/her studies and research into publishable articles and/or presentations at professional meetings. All members of the faculty have experience with publications and they can advise and supervise the student's efforts to disseminate findings. Occasionally faculty and students may collaborate on an article or presentation.

5. Employer Involvement Option

One of the ways Greenleaf University hopes to encourage employers to provide their employees with tuition support and tuition remission programs is to offer the Employer Involvement Option. The concept is very simple and basic. Students are involved throughout the curriculum in at least seven opportunities to research and develop projects, some of which will no doubt be of interest and value to their employers. The option program thus basically offers to employers an opportunity to get a return on their investment in the student's doctoral research program. In addition, a number of employers have taken a proactive response to this option by creating an internal team of advisors to support and enhance the student's research. The end result is that the student's research experience is considerably enriched by having the faculty team supplemented by practitioners in the student's profession and field.

TUITION AND FEES

A traditional graduate academic program, especially at the doctoral level, can require up to seven years to complete and cost up to $125,000. Because Greenleaf University heavily relies on mid-career professionals' experiential base to greatly augment learning, the Master programs can be completed is as little as eighteen months, and the doctoral program in as little as two years. (For the doctoral program, three years is much closer to the average amount of time the professional will require to complete the program.) Because Greenleaf University is a virtual campus, the learner is not supporting the extravagant cost of fixed facilities. These savings are passed on to the Greenleaf learner. The Master programs can be completed for as little as $12,000 to $14,000. The doctoral program can be completed for as little as $15,000 to $18,000. (Again, because three years is closer to the average, the average cost for the doctoral program might be closer to $20,000 to $24,000).

APPLICATION

TUITION

Please note: All fees associated with this University are assessed in US dollars.

Tuition fees for Masters Programs is $300 per month. Tuition fees for PhD Programs is $1,500 per Quarter, or $500 monthly, payable on the FIRST of each month. Tuition paid quarterly is payable fifteen days in advance of the beginning of the new calendar quarter. The first tuition payment is due on the first day of the first month of the calendar quarter following date of acceptance to Greenleaf University.

The date of enrollment for tuition purposes is the first day of the first month of the calendar quarter following acceptance to Greenleaf University. If payment is received after the due date but prior to the fifteenth of the first month of the calendar quarter, a late fee of $100 will be assessed. If payment is not received by the fifteenth of the first month of the new calendar quarter, the learner will be suspended.

If a learner desires to be reinstated after financial suspension, a $100 reinstatement fee will be charged if reinstatement occurs during the current or subsequent quarter. A learner will be reinstated only upon meeting all outstanding financial obligations including prepayment for the following quarter. If a learner fails to bring his/her financial account current during the subsequent quarter, the learner will be dismissed.

COURSE MATERIALS

Learners will pay a $250 course materials fee to Greenleaf University. This one-time fee covers all course materials. These include the GU Information Network and Library/Research Primer, the Personal and Professional Growth Plan (PPGP), the Learner Handbook, Robert Greenleaf's Servant Leadership: A Journey Into the Nature of Legitimate Power and Greatness, the A.P.A. Style Manual, the GU Catalog, the Administrative/Faculty Handbook, and the appropriate academic program. Course materials will be mailed to the learner upon acceptance to Greenleaf University, and receipt of the $250 course materials fee. This will allow the learner to begin the PPGP.

ORIENTATION

There is no residency requirement for Master of Science students. New doctoral learners are required to attend a two-day orientation which generally is scheduled immediately preceding the residency. During the orientation, the learner is introduced to Greenleaf University student services such as internet and library support. The learner also receives computer instruction and information on the academic program and mentoring system. Additionally, the learner will receive assistance in preparation of the Personal and Professional Growth Plan (PPGP), personal counseling on career development, and assistance with research technique and writing style. A learner may begin the program prior to attending orientation. However, the orientation greatly enhances the learner's understanding of the program.

The orientation is a residence requirement and cannot be waived. The Orientation Fee is $250, payable thirty days in advance of the seminar. Travel, lodging, and meal expenses are not included in this $250 fee and are the responsibility of the learner.

Goals and Purposes.

1. Acclimate and acculturize new students to Greenleaf University and begin the process of being productive by developing an outline of the Personal and Professional Growth Plan (PPGP).
2. Provide guidance and support for students for self-directed study and management.
3. Underscore and explore the mentor-mentee, adult student relationship.
4. Provide diagnostic opportunities for identifying writing problems and difficulties if any and for determining capacity of students to complete the program and not to enter the limbo of All But Dissertation (ABD).
5. Introduce students to some of the faculty and to each other as the first stage of networking.
6. Assist in the development of electronic literacy skills.

Duration and Linkage. The duration is two days, usually a weekend beginning on Friday evening and concluding on Sunday at noon. The orientation can be offered any time of the year as a stand-alone activity. It also may precede the week-long residency.

Typical Orientation Program.

Friday Evening:

Lifelines--taking stock

Saturday:

Program Overview:
PPGP
Learning Agreements
Modules
Capstone Integration Orals (CIO)
Dissertation


Getting Started and Organized:
Nature of self-directed study
Management of time, space, family and relationships, work, etc.
Diagnostic: Writing and Critical Thinking
Diagnostic: Completion Deficiencies
Mentor-Mentee relationships
Career paths and Employer Involvement Option (EIO)
Outline of PPGP--application of the above plus Lifelines


Sunday:
Building Research Capacity
Nature of academic research
Academic literacy and apparatus--research standards, protocols, and skills
Electronic literacy--research technology
Researcher as knowledge worker
Futures Research Agenda

RESIDENCY

Each doctoral learner is required to attend annually a week-long residency each calendar year during enrollment in the doctoral program. This requirement may be waived under exceptional circumstances with written permission of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, as long as the learner attends at least one session prior to graduation. The seminar fee is $1,000. Lodging and meals will be charged in addition to the seminar fee. The estimated cost of lodging and meals for the two-week seminar is $750. Travel expenses are the responsibility of the learner.

During the residency, Greenleaf University sponsors a series of presentations and panel discussions to stimulate awareness of current issues in leadership, to promote scholarly discussion among learners and faculty, and to provide an opportunity for learners and faculty to socialize. The topics selected for the presentation focus on global and trans-cultural dimensions of the GU program within various professional fields. Faculty are present for mentoring learners. Residency also is an excellent opportunity for learners to progress on program modules.

Students who have completed all the required modules, passed the Capstone Integration Orals, and are involved in the research proposal and dissertation phase of the program will be requested to serve as presenters, seminar associates, mentor associate discussants, and/or conveners at the residency session. Appropriate training of these senior students will be provided prior to the residency.

Goals and Purposes.

1. To facilitate progress through the program
2. To offer exemplary models of academic research, futures studies and servant leadership
3. To build research capacity
4. To provide instruction and application for electronic library access and searches
5. To explore career paths
6. To provide opportunities for advising and mentoring by faculty and networking by students and alumni
7. To provide writing tutorials and completion interventions on an individual tutorial basis
8. To hold graduation ceremonies

Components of the Residency.

1. Module Workshops
2. Plenary Presentations
3. Building Research Capacity
4. Multi-disciplinary Seminars
5. Guest Futurists in Residence
6. Advising/Mentoring
7. Student Networking
8. Career Pathways
9. Writing and Completion Tutorials
10. Student/Alumni Presentations

CAPSTONE INTEGRATION, PROPOSAL, & DISSERTATION ORALS

The doctoral learner is required to undergo three orals presentations--the Capstone Integration Orals (CIO), proposal of the dissertation orals, and dissertation orals. All orals are conducted by telephone conference call and recorded on file. These must be arranged and coordinated by the learner. Average expense for each is about $200.

DISSERTATION PROCESSING

Additionally, the doctoral learner will pay a dissertation processing fee. This includes submission of the dissertation to a style and format editor, microfilming, copying, and binding. The fee for dissertation processing is $750. This fee is payable to Greenleaf University upon approval and acceptance of the final dissertation.

GRADUATION FEE

The fee for graduation activities is $1,000. Graduation will be held once annually. This fee includes the cost of the diploma, hood, ceremony, banquet, and related activities, as well as the cost of cap and gown. Learners will be charged the fee whether or not they attend graduation. Payment is due sixty days prior to graduation. Graduates will not receive their diploma until the fee has been paid.

REFUND POLICY

Application Fee. Non-refundable.

Tuition. Fully refundable for following quarter if requested in writing and quarter has not yet begun. Non-refundable once quarter has begun.

Course Materials. Fully refundable if requested in writing before materials are received. Non-refundable if initial materials already have been delivered (PPGP, Servant Leadership, and A.P.A. publication manual).

Orientation Fee. Fully refundable if requested in writing with a postmark thirty days prior to the orientation. Non-refundable if requested with less than thirty days. However, the applicant may request to attend one of the next two scheduled orientations at no extra charge.

Residency Fee. Fully refundable if requested in writing with a postmark thirty days prior to the residency. Generally non-refundable if requested with less than thirty days. Partially refundable under special circumstances if approved by the Vice President for Administration.

Orals Expenses. These costs are contracted by the student with outside agencies.

Dissertation Processing. Fully refundable if no costs have occurred with contracted organizations. Students must bear the cost for all work performed.

Graduation Fees. Non-refundable. However, if the student desires to attend a later graduation, this can be arranged.

WITHDRAWAL, DISMISSAL, AND READMISSION

WITHDRAWAL

Any learner may request to withdraw from the Greenleaf University program in writing for any reason at any time. Refund policies, listed above, apply.

READMISSION

Learners may request readmission in writing for continuance at any time within a two-year period from date of withdrawal. There will be a readmission fee of $250 in addition to pre-payment for the following quarter.

DISMISSAL

A learner can be dismissed from Greenleaf University for several reasons. The first is failure to make satisfactory academic progress. Satisfactory progress is defined as completion of at least two modules in four quarters. A learner also can be dismissed for unethical conduct or failure to pay tuition in a timely manner.

READMISSION

Once a learner is dismissed, the learner can apply in writing for readmission. The application must address the reasons the learner believes that the action which led to dismissal has been corrected and will not recur. If readmission is favorably considered, the cost for readmission is $250.

FINANCIAL AID

Greenleaf University has an appropriate number of student fellowships and scholarships. Most require involvement in an internship capacity by students. At this point, three kinds of fellowships, each valued at $1,000 per academic year, are available: Research Fellowships, Servant Leadership Fellowships, and Greenleaf Administrative Fellowships.

Greenleaf University offers a limited number of Research/ Administrative Assistantships (RA). Students apply for assistantship positions through the Vice President for Academic Affairs. These are awarded based on the prevailing needs of the faculty.

Students can earn a partial tuition waiver in exchange for service hours to university faculty or administration. Students must be in good standing with the University both academically and financially in order to apply for and maintain an assistantship.

The World Future Society also offers annually ten partial fellowships to Greenleaf University. These are competitive fellowships, and defray $2,400 of the annual $7,800 tuition. Students must be members in good standing with the World Future Society for consideration. These fellowships apply to both the doctoral and Master of Science in Futures Studies programs.

Other forms of financial aid are available through private foundations and employment reimbursement plans. Greenleaf offers direction in securing these alternative sources of financial assistance through the Director of Information Management and Marketing but relies on learners to coordinate the application for external support. For more information, write to us at admin@greenleaf.edu.

STUDENT SERVICES

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT

Administrative services can be reached by contacting Dr. Shamir Ally.

LIBRARY SERVICES

Greenleaf University provides access to the University of Alabama Library at Huntsville, AL. This is done through the University Internet Website and the use of an 800 number provided by the University of Alabama. The cost of materials loan access and computer based searches are included in the quarterly tuition and fees. The learner will receive more information about this service with the course materials.

INTERNET ACCESS

Greenleaf University is on-line twenty-four hours via the Internet Website located at http://www.greenleaf.edu. Additionally, all faculty are on-line so that learners may correspond with their faculty advisors regularly. Students are assigned an e-mail address at the University and have access to the Director of Information Services for guidance in establishing and using Internet access.